Tag Archive: marketing

  1. Leveraging Your Brand With Podcast Interviews

    In 2019, many of us take for granted the fact that we can watch any TV show, movie or YouTube video, or listen to any audiobook, song or podcast at any time of day, 24/7, 365. You might think that if we had been offered the opportunity for this kind of on-demand entertainment 15 years ago, we would have jumped at it, right? Well, we were offered that opportunity in 2005, when Apple first debuted podcasts two years before Netflix began streaming shows.

    Fast forward to 2010, five years after we first had the opportunity to walk around with podcasts on our ipods wherever we wantless than a quarter of Americans reported having ever even listened to one. While it may seem crazy that we did not latch onto podcasts right away, on-demand audio/visual entertainment was simply not a staple of our culture yet. But the last ten years have brought the rise of Netflix, Hulu, Youtube, Spotify, and an army of other streaming services offering on-demand entertainment, creating a wave for podcasts to ride right into the mainstream of American life. As of earlier this year, there are more than 30 million podcasts episodes, and more than 50% of Americans report having listened to at least one in their lifetimes. 

    What do these statistics mean for the media landscape? Well, last year, news podcasts pulled in more ad revenue than any other podcast genre. People are listening to podcasts.

    With this in mind, should pitching clients or company leaders to podcasts be a part of your media relations strategy? 

    I’ll admit it, as a PR professional, podcasts can be a scary proposition. The first time I had a client express interest in one, I was skeptical. Long-form, unstructured, recorded conversations do not necessarily create a breeding ground for tight, concise messaging and talking points. Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s infamous weed-smoking incident on comedian Joe Rogan’s podcast is a stark reminder of what can go wrong when stepping behind the podcast mic. 

    However, despite their risks, podcasts offer tremendous publicity advantages, and I have been pleasantly surprised by the success many of my clients have found in them.

    For those who have found success as podcast guests, I’ve observed a common theme: successful podcast guests know their story and stick to it. 

    As with any media interview, you must know what you are going to say before you say it. Podcasts offer the ultimate opportunity to tell your story in a long-form setting, but conversely, offer ample time to put your proverbial foot in your mouth. Knowing your talking points and not straying too far from them will help protect you from saying something you’ll regret. 

    Once you know your messaging and are confident sticking to it, podcasts will open up a whole new world of targeted messaging.

    One of the biggest goals (and often one of the largest challenges) of any brand is getting their story/product/brand in front of the right demographic. Podcasts offer a unique opportunity to reach a niche group of people who you know are interested in what you have to say, by virtue of the fact they are listening to a specific podcast. For example, a client of mine was recently featured on a show titled “Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever.” Can you guess what industry the client is in and what demographic of people listen to that show? I’m guessing the answer is yes. Not only is a feature on an industry-specific podcast like this a sure-fire way to get your story in front of the right people, but it also builds credibility by proving you’re an expert in your field. For the most part, podcast hosts do their homework and won’t just bring anyone on their shows, so know that if they chose you to bring value to their listeners, it’s a validation of your expertise.

    Now that you have the ear of your target audience, you will have the ability to really tell your story. While traditional media outlets allow for concise soundbites and snippets of information, podcasts allow you to dive deep into your company’s history, culture and goals. While this may be scary, remember that in today’s fast-paced, increasingly digital world, consumers are longing for a human touch. Showing your company’s humanity through in-depth storytelling will go a long way in building trust with your current and future customers, and podcasts are the perfect medium to give them a taste of your story. 

    Because of the depth that they allow for, podcast interviews can be a treasure trove of content. Once your company or client has a few under their belt, use them to gather information for future media opportunities as well as fodder for social media and web content. If you are featured on a podcast, link to it on your company’s website! This cross pollination will help bring your company more publicity and will boost SEO for your website. 

    Another way to extend the life of your podcasts is to transcribe them and post the transcription to your website along with the link to the audio. A transcribed interview will not only double as great web content for your company, it will also help prospective customers find you via keyword searches of the content in your interview. 

    So what are the next steps if you are looking to leverage podcasts to tell your brand story? A simple place to start is to begin listening to podcasts if you don’t already. Ask a trusted colleague or mentor what podcasts they enjoy, and give them a try. Not every podcast will be appropriate for your brand, so you’ll need to do some sifting to find out where you best fit before diving in head first. 

    After you find the right fit, be confident in the story you have to tell and don’t forget to stay on brand. When your interview is over and your podcast is released, share it far and wide!

  2. Picture This: The Big Benefits of Original Imagery and Design Over Stock Photos

    It may seem unnecessary—maybe even wasteful—but budgeting for custom photography and design is money well spent for your content and brand. It creates a level of credibility and authenticity with your audience. Simply stated, it’s been proven that people respond better to original images.

    Don’t get me wrong, though. Stock photos are very purposeful if you have budget or time constraints. But, it can be pretty easy to recognize stock in print and digital—images can look very polished, almost too professional and too generic in subject matter. They can also be easily recognized as stock because everyone else on the planet has access to that very same image. You might have seen the same model on an insurance billboard, an attorney’s print ad and your chiropractor’s website. Even worse, some stock photos look cheap and generic. And don’t get me started on the ever-present group photos of business professionals.

     

    stock photo

    A stock photo staple

    Mike Dobies said it best: “When is the last time you’ve seen a teenage Asian girl, a hipster bearded twenty-something, a middle-aged professional Black woman, and a savvy-suited elder businessman all in a conference room together? Few offices represent 100% of America’s melting pot.”

    If you ask any designer or art director how many hours they have spent searching through stock photos for that perfect shot, they will probably roll their eyes and tell you how it’s shaved years off of their life. They’re being paid to spend hours searching for the perfect image—one that they’ll probably have to spend time reworking later just to make it fit in a layout. Yes, Photoshop is a powerful tool that can create magic when used by the right hands. But, sometimes the end result still doesn’t hit the mark.

    For example, when you say, “Let’s take this model and put her into this environment,” the altered image may not look quite like you envisioned regardless of how much time was spent editing. So, now you have invested time and money with nothing to show for it. (And, it’s important to note that the high-end, more unique stock images aren’t cheap, to begin with.)

    The beauty of hiring a photographer to capture your own original images is that you avoid the “Frankenstein” approach (in other words: patching pieces and parts together to see if they work). When a design is created with custom imagery, the concept feels more complete because every element of it was intentional. And when art directors and photographers work together, that’s when the magic happens: Your brand evolves into a cohesive, visual experience that takes the viewer on a journey.

    When it comes to your brand, your first impression is critical. So, take a second thought before using your own DIY designs, or hiring the family member who took a design class at the local community college. Hire a professional. Whether it’s photography or graphics, using custom imagery can increase engagement and conversions, as well as boost your overall brand experience. And trust us–that that extra time and attention to detail is priceless.

  3. 3 Quick Blog Writing Tips to Command Your Audience’s Attention

    Blog Writing Tips

    Attention! It’s a word plastered on many a warning sign, meant to tell people, “Hey, this is important.” Oh, if only you could just slap one of those bad boys onto the header of a blog and call it a day. Keeping an audience’s attention is unfortunately far more complicated than that, especially with modern attention spans something like water in the Sahara–in desperate demand and more valuable than diamonds.

    So, how does a modern blogger keep the reader from drifting off to his or her Facebook feed or the next Netflix original series? Spoiler alert: it’s difficult. However, I have a few quick tips that will help keep your readers engaged.

    Quick Blog Writing Tips to Keep Your Readers Engaged

     

    • Lists: Meta, I know. Though often unfairly derided as a cheap “Buzzfeed” style that’s lacking in substance, lists make your article far easier to read. Not only breaking up what would otherwise be a wall of words, lists allow readers to scan your article for its main points and (hopefully) come back for more when they have the time.
    • Visuals: Just like lists, images and videos can help break up your content into easily digestible sections. Imagery can also work as an attention grabber, keeping eyeballs on the page longer. Just ensure that you have the right to use the imagery within your blog post.
    • K.I.S.S.: If you, like me, love creative writing, you may be tempted to craft deeply illustrative long-form content. That’s great, and can be an effective way of humanizing your brand or providing an informative deep dive on a concept, but always make sure you trim the fat on your content. If you can say it with fewer words, that’s often the way to go. Keep it simple.

     

    By implementing lists, adding vivid visuals and keeping it simple, you just may notice even the most scatterbrained of readers stick around and potentially even click through to more content. Though keeping a modern reader’s attention is an uphill battle, the written word is far from obsolete. These blog writing tips can be the finger snap your content needs to command your audience’s attention.

  4. 8 Powerful Springtime Marketing Tips to Make Your Brand Blossom

    marketing tips

     

    Spring has officially sprung, bringing with it a sense of renewal and rejuvenation. Though traditionally a time we associate with tending the garden as flowers begin to bloom, I see some direct correlations between springtime planting and mastering marketing’s many (sometimes thorny) facets. Inspired by the season, here are eight springtime marketing tips that will help your business bloom.

    1. Planting Seeds: Storytelling is the seed of great marketing, and brands that tell a compelling story get the most attention. Storytelling that rings true helps to personalize your brand to an audience looking to make a human connection–not a corporate one. Nike gets this right on the money, crafting a tonally perfect story for nearly every product and creating content that inspires interaction. 
    2. Birds of a Feather Flock Together: The type of content you create and its style are largely based on understanding who your clients and prospects are and how best to reach them. You must know your audience just as well as you know your own product in order to speak authentically and make a more meaningful connection. 
    3. Choosing the Right Fertilizer: As we know, planting the seed is just the start. In order to grow and flourish, you need a team of people who are multidimensional, diverse and has a grasp on today’s socially-conscious consumers. Starbucks has a powerful stance on inclusivity and hiring the best, brightest and most dynamic mix of people from all walks of life. 
    4. Be a Social Butterfly! By sharing content on social media channels like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, you can effectively share your messages and start a conversation with fans. Additionally, consider writing thought leadership content, such as guest blog posts, for popular websites in your industry and backlinking to your website. This is a simple, smart way of building awareness and credibility within your niche. 
    5. Soak Up Some Sun: Good public relations efforts can put the spotlight on your marketing efforts as long as you have a story to tell and know the right person to pitch. Falcon’s Creative Group, a developer of amusement attraction experiences, often shares their latest exciting projects with trade publications within their wheelhouse. This gets the news out to the people who care about their work and positions them as an industry leader. So, go on–don’t be afraid to get your brand out in that sunshine. 
    6. Having a Garden Variety: In 2018, creativity counts more than ever. Do something different, create a shareable meme, try a strategic sponsorship, pin images on Pinterest and share user-generated content. For example, check out Old Town’s Instagram page. This iconic Kissimmee, Florida walking district full of shops, rides, food and entertainment, shares regrams of user-generated photos, which has enhanced social engagement. 
    7. Staying Fresh as a Daisy: If you lose sight of what’s working and what’s not, your marketing can quickly become anything but spring-fresh. For instance, if you’re a smaller craft brewery looking to bring in locals, spending your marketing budget on a wide-spanning social media push rather than investing in sampling events or pop-up shops at the farmers market may be a misstep. Barnie’s Coffee keeps their efforts fresh by focusing on local outreach opportunities like this one benefitting survivors of the Pulse Nightclub tragedy. 
    8. Celebrate a Bumper Crop: Metrics can tell you if you’re blooming or wilting on the vine. It’s only through taking a hard look at the numbers that you can measure successes or failures and react accordingly. You simply don’t know what you don’t measure.

    Spring is a time of rejuvenation. And in the spirit of the season, I encourage you to shine some new light on your marketing. From planting the seeds of storytelling to following your metrics, and everything in between, refreshing your marketing strategy can grow your brand. Ahhh, the sweet smell of success.  

     

  5. Cup of Tea: How Vague Target Audiences Can Ruin Your Brand Strategy

    To many in our office, coffee is the great nectar of the gods–a blessing that provides a much-needed jolt of energy to kickstart creativity and productivity at the start of the day. For those diehard coffee drinkers, it may be hard to believe that some people don’t even like coffee, let alone drink the stuff. That’s right. Some people prefer tea. With this in mind, it’s not surprising that Folgers executes a brand strategy that focuses on those who consider their first cup of coffee “the best part of waking up,” instead of wasting their time, energy and budget talking to the uninterested, committed tea drinkers.

    Understanding that concept, why do so many companies still insist on being everything for everyone? There is a very natural desire to sell to as wide an audience as possible and cast as wide a net as you can. It makes sense–a larger audience equals greater success, right? Unfortunately, it’s not quite that simple. When writing my book, Formulaic: How Thriving Companies Market From the Core, I found one example of the opposite being true: an example that proves products and brands can flourish if their brand strategy is laser focused instead of vaguely aimed at mass appeal.

    A Story of Putters and Passion

    For those who enjoy the sport of golf, Scotty Cameron is a name that resonates with respect. Maturing his childhood love of golf into an obsession of the game and the gear used to play it, Cameron focused on a singular goal: to build the best putter in golf. And he did just that, developing putters used to win 15 championships and tournaments that include the US Open and the Masters. What started as a childhood obsession is now a business that rakes in over $100 million in revenue annually and serves the likes of Tiger Woods and Jordan Spieth. But it’s not just the pros who flock to Cameron’s clubs. ZZ Top drummer and amateur golfer Frank Beard has a fully customized collection valued at $1.5 million.

    While Cameron’s clubs are obviously a big hit with his target audience, his putters are expressly not for everyone. Priced at nearly $400 (double the price of many others on the market), the potential audience for these clubs is instantly thinned out by the sticker shock alone. Yet Cameron continues to be successful. Why?

    More than just an inspiring story of dream fulfillment, Scotty Cameron is a case study on why doing one thing exceptionally well for a highly specific audience can be far more lucrative than a scattershot approach with no clear direction. Cameron’s putters aren’t made for the casual fan. They are crafted with passion and quality for people who share his love for the sport. “Naysayers said that we (don’t) need another putter maker, so I tried to be the best putter maker,” commented Cameron.

    Hunting the YETI

    Many outdoorsy activities require their enthusiasts to brave everything from extreme heat to frigid cold, downpouring rain to bone-dry conditions. There was a need for equipment that could weather the same conditions its users could and keep ice frozen or coffee hot. For YETI, this need translated into an opportunity.

    Now known at the name in coolers, tumblers and similar gear, YETI first began when brothers Ryan and Roy Seiders discovered this need for quality coolers firsthand while hunting and fishing. Assuming that other lovers of the great outdoors experience similar issues, the two ventured to solve this highly specific problem for a highly specific audience–people like themselves. Though priced at a premium, YETI products targeted the people who care about quality when it comes to a cooler. Through a product that lived up to its promises, word-of-mouth spread in the serious fishing, hunting and camping communities. This reputation, paired with engagement with outdoors enthusiast influencers, turned YETI into a genuine phenomenon in this highly specific target market. Eventually, word spread of the nearly magical qualities of YETI products to keep cold drinks cold and hot drinks hot (while taking a licking), opening it up to an even wider audience. Though now a mainstream brand, YETI’s wide success is largely due to the Seiders brothers’ laser-like focus and commitment to a singular market.

    The Right Product to the Right People

    Like Scotty Cameron’s premium putters or the Seiders brothers’ top-tier YETI products, your brand strategy can carve out a niche by tightly focusing efforts on a specific audience. It is OK to be ignored by a large swath of people as long as you are beloved by a designated few: your target audience. Brands die in the middle. Pick a side and serve it better than anyone else. That’s what Scotty Cameron and the Seiders did and what may work for your company as well. It’s OK to not be everyone’s cup of tea.

  6. How Formulaic Thinking Can Revolutionize Your Marketing Strategy

    Marketing Strategy

     

    The magical silver bullet. Like unicorns and fairy dust, though it may be a pleasant concept to dream of, the legendary silver bullet that can solve all of your marketing strategy woes is just that–a thing of legend. So often, I come across business owners and marketing managers who understand this fact well enough, yet continue their search for this mythical one-stop fix to whatever ails their brand. Why? Well, it is certainly much easier to assume that if your branding only had X, it could finally break through to that elusive target audience or market.

    The hard truth is that the best brands do multiple things well in order to find success and become more than just a peddler of goods to their audiences. A marketing strategy is much more akin to a formula of different elements, combined to create an explosive mixture that sends your brand to the stratosphere. Thriving businesses understand that their brand values, beliefs and ideals are powerful tools for mastering marketing strategy. By asking yourself some pointed questions about your brand, you can come closer to identifying those elements and concocting the formula of success for your business.

    What Questions Should I Ask to Identify the Needs of My Marketing Strategy?

     

    • How did you get here? Why was this business created in the first place? What decisions were made and why? What was the initial inspiration or passion that launched this endeavor and is it still what drives the company to this day? Thriving businesses are driven by well-considered decisions.
    • What does your company value? Values are important. They often dictate everything from price to the product. Defining values can help you ensure that your marketing and brand as a whole is focused on facilitating and fulfilling that value and avoids muddying the water and losing its way. Successful businesses keep their eye on the ball.
    • What is your brand’s story? Since the time of cavemen, people have huddled around a fire to listen to and tell stories. Why? Storytelling is an inherently human form of expression that works on an emotional level. If you don’t want your marketing to get lost in the advertising white noise, you have to leverage the power of storytelling in your marketing strategy. Saying your washing machine is the fastest on the market is not enough. You have to show how it helps a single dad tackle laundry faster than ever, so he has time to surprise his kids with his special homemade pizza after school.

      On a higher level, your brand’s story can help build interest and connect with customers in a far more intimate way than sticking to the facts alone. In fact, researchers have discovered that storytelling empirically improves message recall and fosters a feeling similar to kindness. That is truly powerful stuff.
    • Who is your brand selling to? As most writers will tell you, knowing your audience is not only important–it is mandatory. Knowing your audience, who you serve, is the first step in any successful marketing strategy. From there, a marketer can shape tactics and tone to meet those people where they live and breathe with content they’re hungry to consume. If you’re not selling to a specific audience, you’re probably selling to no one.

     

    I explore more questions to consider in my latest book, Formulaic: How Thriving Companies Market From the Core, but this is a good primer for any brand looking for a way to think more formulaically about their marketing strategy. Dig deep, look internally and ask the difficult questions. Remember, silver-bullet solutions are fantasy–it’s introspective, well-strategized marketing and branding that wins the day

     

  7. Findsome & Winmore Announces Plans to Occupy and Remodel 8,000 Square-Foot Building in Winter Park

    Orlando digital marketing firm enlists help of local clients to relocate headquarters ahead of anticipated agency growth

     

    Findsome & Winmore, the classic digital marketing agency that helps clients find and win new customers, announces today plans to relocate its headquarters to an 8,000 square-foot, full building located at 1550 South Lakemont Avenue in Winter Park. This announcement comes as the company prepares for continued strategic growth in 2018 and beyond.

    In searching for and finalizing the purchase of its new space, Findsome & Winmore enlisted the help of clients Foundry Commercial, Fountainhead Commercial Capital, and Sloane & Johnson. Additionally, Baker Barrios Architects, another Findsome & Winmore client, will oversee the remodeling of the building.

    “We have always considered ourselves to be an extension of our clients’ teams, so involving them in the process of finding our new home was very special for us, ” said Matt Certo, CEO and principal at Findsome & Winmore. “With their assistance, we have found a space that will not only allow us to grow our agency significantly over the next 18 months, but will also provide our team members with a creative, interactive environment they can thrive in. We thank Foundry Commercial, Fountainhead Commercial Capital and Baker Barrios Architects for their continued, invaluable insight as we embark on this journey.”

    Findsome & Winmore’s decision to relocate its headquarters comes just two years after the company expanded its current office space, increasing office capacity from approximately 15 people to 25 people. Now, the company is moving to a building that will sustain its steady growth trajectory while permitting extra room for a kitchen, coffee bar, multiple meeting spaces and more.

    In 2017 alone, Findsome & Winmore’s growth involved the onboarding of multiple new clients, including Virgin Produced, Tijuana Flats, Children’s Home Society, onePULSE Foundation, Park Square Homes, and more.

    Following a five-month construction period, the Findsome & Winmore team will relocate to its new office in May 2018.

  8. Findsome & Winmore Continues Momentum In Third Quarter of 2017

    Findsome & Winmore, the classic digital marketing agency that helps clients “find and win” new customers, completed a successful third quarter with the addition of new employees and new projects for clients. The company, which is currently in its fourth quarter, announced today the addition of a new client within the real estate industry and the completion of two client rebrands.

    Park Square Homes, a residential real estate company, enlisted Findsome & Winmore for various services including public relations, website maintenance, and digital marketing. Additionally, the agency completed rebrands for Bourne Financial Group, a real estate private equity company, Spectrum Global, a telecommunications firm, and Tews, an employment agency. Both Tews and Bourne Financial Group also hired Findsome & Winmore to create their respective company websites.

    “We are pleased to know that our clients continue to put their trust in Findsome & Winmore in their digital marketing endeavors,” said Matt Certo, chief executive officer of Findsome & Winmore. “We had a very solid third quarter and are looking forward to ending 2017 on a high note, with additional clients and new projects. As we move through our fourth quarter, we anticipate helping even more clients find and win new customers.”

    Findsome & Winmore also added three new employees to its growing team with backgrounds in creativity, marketing and public relations. Moreover, the company continued to expand its content presence through its email marketing series, entitled “Marketing Tip Monday,” providing subscribers with tips on an array of business growth topics, http://www.marketingtipmonday.com

  9. The Roll Out of Twitter’s Increased Character Limit

     

    Soon, we could all be saying goodbye to the days of reading and re-reading our would-be tweet to find out what words are actually necessary to convey our important thought. In a surprise update, Twitter has announced it will begin to roll out a 280 character limit to some users, doubling the original 140 character limit.

    The micro-blogging platform provided some pretty sound reasoning for the update, namely, equality across languages. Users who tweet in Japanese, Korean and Chinese are able to convey more information using fewer characters. In other words, they can say twice as much while using half the characters as users who tweet in most other languages. According to Twitter, Japanese users hit the character limit only about .4% of the time while 9% of tweets in English use all 140 characters.

    How does this change the way we use the platform?

    Twitter will always be about brevity, but the 140-character limit was conceived at a time when flip phones and SMS messaging reigned. As society has moved on to smartphones and data plans, the platform has been hesitant to adapt, slowing user growth, and scaring away some investors.

    This shift to an increased character limit will hopefully invigorate user growth on the platform, leading to more meaningful and engaging conversations between users.

    The formula is simple:

    This increase is especially helpful for brands that routinely feel the pain of links depleting their already scarce character count within tweets. While links will still count toward the character limit, an increase from 140 to 280 characters leaves more room for brands to tweet without skimping on their message or leaving out an important link.

    So this sample tweet about our client:

    We are loving all of our new apparel options. Are you? Shop the collection and show the world that #WeWillNotLetHateWin http://bit.ly/2r9qft0

    No longer has to be this:

    We are ❤️ all of our new ?? options. Are you? Shop the collection & show the ?  that #WeWillNotLetHateWin http://bit.ly/2r9qft0

    Social media is a constantly updating medium, so, only time will tell if this change becomes the official standard, and for how long. For my money, the promise of major benefits and ease of use for countless users around the world just might make Twitter’s increased character limit a big winner by allowing people and brands more “real estate” to get their messages across. In the meantime, we’ll be keeping a close eye on whether this change is worth a “like.”

  10. What is a Media Kit and Why Does It Matter?

    media kit

    The most important thing you need to know about effective public relations is that its purpose is to build a mutually beneficial relationship between an organization and their publics. Textbook definitions aside, it always helps when the public is accurately informed. While there are multiple ways to do this, one surefire method to help control your own message is with a media kit.

    A media kit, or press kit, can be a company’s best friend when it comes to conveying precise information to an influencer, blogger, reporter, or member of the media. It is essentially a pre-packaged set of promotional materials that provides any information about a cause, company, organization or person that can be distributed for promotional use. Most of the time, reporters are the ones who receive these kits, and boy, do they find them helpful. You see, a media kit is different from a marketing brochure or website because it has such targeted information. Some company websites tend to have information about everything pertaining to the company as opposed to a singular focus, as they are trying to appeal to such a broad audience; the same can be said about marketing brochures. Media kits typically convey the information that is most pertinent – the exact information that companies want to see printed in a news story or feature.

    The media kit varies depending on the company. For example, at Findsome & Winmore, one of our clients is Orlando’s popular entertainment district, Old Town. The media kit we designed for this particular client is filled with colorful images of the property, along with a map of the district, and an overview of its shops and restaurants.

    media kit

    Another of our clients is Fountainhead Commercial Capital, a non-bank commercial lender. To contrast, their media kit gives an overview of the company’s founder, Chris Hurn, along with his headshot, company statistics, frequently asked questions and previous media placements.

    media kit

    When deciding what to include in a media kit, it would be wise to ask yourself what you want reporters to know about your company and/or products. Speaking from experience, reporters are very busy people. Anything you can do to make their jobs a little easier will be appreciated and potentially rewarded with some attention. A media kit is one way to do just that, giving reporters a valuable source of information that helps them build their stories. But what are the specific benefits to media kits? Let me count the ways.

    A media kits help with:

    • Making a first impression: Think of a media kit like an eye-catching resume. It helps grab media and investor attention and wraps everything into one neat package for a particular target audience. It is a collection of product information and articles assembled to address questions and provide everything needed to engage with your firm.
    • Hyper-targeting your company’s messaging: A media kit should be focused and share the precise messaging that you want to communicate. In short, it should effectively and efficiently tell people what to think.
    • Keeping things affordable: Printing can be costly for companies, so it’s OK to make your media kits available online. Companies often share their media kits on their websites. It is also common practice to make media kits password protected for media members. Either way, this can be much less expensive than reprinting media kits every time there is a change in your product information.
    • Providing assets for influencers: Speaking of downloads, having a media kit available online can also give you a place to share additional assets that media may need. For example, you can make your company logo available for download in the kit, along with approved high-resolution photos of your company, products and employees.

    So, can you get by without having a media kit? The answer is yes, but why make it harder for yourself to score more media coverage and/or investor interest? If getting more attention and responses from members of the press interests you, then creating an effective media kit is public relations 101.

    Be sure to remember that reporters and bloggers do not necessarily have to adhere to the material in your media kit and, sometimes, may not use everything that you give them. However, you can be sure that they have your company’s accurate, endorsed and approved information on hand and ready to use.