Tag Archive: keywords

  1. How to Write an Effective Blog Post in 5 Easy Steps

    So you’ve heard that content is king and you should be blogging? You’ve got an idea of what you should blog about, but you’re not quite sure how to go about it. When content is being created, you want to make sure that you are getting the most out of it, just like anything you invest your time and money in. Below are 5 easy steps to follow when creating content for your blog.

    Step 1: Cut a Hole in the Box.

    Just kidding! First things first, write your post with a keyword (1-2) in mind. The primary keyword is what you are optimizing your content for and the secondary keyword is important, but note that it is not generating as much traffic as the primary one.

    Your keyword also doesn’t necessarily need to be confined to a one-word keyword. You can use long-tailed keywords that typically come in question form. Users search for not just one or two keywords, but will often type in whole questions.

    Once you’ve found what keywords you want to work with, do a little research with Google AdWords, Google Webmaster Tools, or even Raven Tools to see if the keywords you have in mind are being searched for and to see what kind of traffic they are generating. The more traffic, the better!

    Lastly, include your keyword in everything from your title, to the body content, the URL and the meta description. Just. Don’t. Keyword. Stuff. You want your keyword presence to be at least 1.5% and no more than 3%. See the optimization formula below for help.

    Keyword Optimization Formula

    Step 2: Write!

    Okay, you’ve got your keywords. Now you’re ready to let the writing juices flow into the content river of fun. Just make sure that the total word count is at least 500. If the word count is a little less, that’s fine, but generally you don’t want the content to be less than that.

    For extra SEO fun, you can also add in anchor text (a word or phrase that a hyperlink is applied to) to your content. Google considers anchor text to carry more weight to it then just plain text. Be mindful of where you’re linking to though, and how often you’re directing the audience away from your website/blog post. You want a solid mix of inter-linking and linking out. For example, not all links should be directing users away from your website/blog. A good rule of thumb is 4 links for 500 words, with two of those links inter-linking within your site.

    Also, make sure to include alt text and an original meta description. Alt text is the word you can apply to a hyperlinked keyword. As for the meta description, don’t leave it blank and definitely don’t copy and paste content from your post. The meta description is prime retail spot and you can use that area to answer long-tailed keywords/questions, as well as give a teaser on what the post is about.

    Step 3: Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will only hurt you if there are no images.

    What do you find more appealing? An image of a gooey chocolate cake or me just writing about a gooey chocolate cake? Ding! Ding! Ding! The image of the chocolate cake will surely wet your whistle more so than me telling you about it. Be sure to include images in your post to appeal to the masses.

    Chocolate Cake

    By FotoosVanRobin from Netherlands – Chocolate FondantUploaded by Ekabhishek, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10772719

    You also want to make sure that the image(s) you select are under creative commons or purchased via a stock photography site. You’ll also want to name the images before you upload them to your post and give those images alt text as doing so counts towards your SEO!

    Step 4: Tag! You’re It!

    After you’ve created your content with your nifty keywords and your awesome images, make sure to associate your post with categories and tags accordingly. No more than three categories should be applied to each post.

    Categories are more general to the subject material so general topics can be applied. Tags are more specific, and you can add a variety of tags about some of the more specific subject matter.

    Step 5: Cross the Finish Line!

    Just do one final review with the handy checklist below and you’re good to publish that post to the masses!


    Blogging Checklist

     

  2. Do Keywords Really Matter?

    SEO Blogging 101 Series: Part One

    Writing a blog post may be pretty straight-forward, but making it SEO friendly is another story entirely. If you have a great topic that you think your audience will be interested in, then it’s a good idea to go ahead and write it!

    However, it’s also important to make sure that as many users as possible see the content you took the effort to craft. That’s why using an SEO strategy and different content marketing tactics is so important, and why we’ll be exploring the different tactics and strategies that should be applied throughout this series.

    What Role Do Keywords Play?

    To begin with, SEO is not just about the keyword in a topic.  Since Google periodically makes updates to its algorithms that changes how it crawls, indexes, and determines what should appear on search engine result pages (SERPs), knowing how to make each blog post count is important. However, focusing only on a keyword or keyword count won’t get you the ROI you’re looking for.

    Why? Because Google – and even more importantly your audience – doesn’t consider just one specific word when they’re trying to find an answer to something. SEO is an all-encompassing strategy now and takes many factors into consideration. Yes, engaging content is still a driving force and factor, but long-gone are the days of keyword stuffing to get a website to rank as the number one search result. The emphasis now is quality – not quantity.

    HubSpot shares the following,

    “It’s not about choosing the right words anymore — it’s about providing context. Google doesn’t want to return results anymore; it wants to return answers. So, if you’re not doing a good job of answering your prospective customers’ questions, it doesn’t matter what keywords you choose — your SEO will suffer.”

    So what does this mean when it comes to your blog content? Keywords still matter, but they shouldn’t be the focus. In Part One of our SEO Blogging 101 Series, we’ll cover the role keywords play and why they’re still important to consider, but shouldn’t be the sole focus behind online and digital content.

    What’s Your Topic?

    Do you know what you’re writing about? SEO experts have different schools of thought on how valuable a keyword is and what the optimization percentage should be – or if there should be an optimization percentage at all. There is one new update that most SEO connoisseurs agree on: content should be developed with the intent of the searcher in mind.

    I recommend that writers try to optimize the content with a percentage of 1.5% for the keyword in mind, using the following formula:

    SEO Keyword Optimization Formula

    The reason for this is because at the end of the day, there’s no hard and fast rule for how often a keyword should be included in content. Writing with a keyword in mind, though, helps keep the main topic and intent of the searcher as the focus.

    This way the blog post will be included in search results for not just the individual keyword, but also long-tail queries such as: “How can digital marketing for restaurants help me get more customers?” or “What is social media marketing?”

    Remember to keep your writing, keyword phrases, and terminology natural as well. SEO has evolved from focusing on ranking and singular keywords to the overall intent of the searcher and user experience. So yes – write with the keyword “digital marketing” or “seafood for sale” in mind. But also write for what your audience wants to learn and know about. Is your audience really looking for seafood for sale, or are they trying to find a recipe that has seafood in it?

    Keywords have a role and a place, but be careful not to focus so much on one word or phrase that you completely miss the point of posting content in the first place: to engage with your audience.