Tag Archive: keyword research

  1. What Facebook’s New “Buy Button” Means for Your Business

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    You know that guy with the bagel cart rolling by your office in the morning? You were busy getting started on your business of the day, then this guy rolls up and well, now you’re hungry. “Ok,” you think to yourself. “I’ll grab a bagel.”

    The convenience of the impulse buy is hard to ignore. And more often than not, it doesn’t feel like we’re being sold or marketed to. We usually feel pretty confident that this is our decision. Yes, we didn’t know we were about to make this purchase, but we are totally in control and definitely want it. Right?

    Recently Facebook announced their new Buy Button which will allow your customers to purchase products from businesses without ever having to leave Facebook, mobile included. Your customers will be able to complete their entire order process (even shipping settings and payment) all in one cozy nook of the world’s favorite social media home away from home. Whether this sounds scary or convenient, it’s time to start planning how your business will adapt. Here are 3 things to consider when examining the new Facebook Buy Button, and what it means to you and your business.

    1. Say Goodbye to distracting ads and hello to engaging content.

    If you’ve ever tried Facebook ads to promote your company or goods and services, the buy button is a good thing. Buying online ads are hard to quantify from a success point of view. Sure you can track clicks and click throughs, even track where purchases came from. But these efforts typically work better in concept than application. Here’s the next step. Stop buying traditional Facebook Ads. With the buy button you no longer have to throw money at distracting your customers. You can, instead, connect with them via your content. Content that they’d be choosing to engage with anyway. Have a cool new product you want to get out to market, or even test? This could be where you do that.

    It’s a fact of life that many content owners are now looking to their “readers’ offers” initiatives to build e-commerce into their content sites. – Forbes (http://www.forbes.com/sites/haydnshaughnessy/2014/07/18/facebook-shopping-button-could-be-amazon-reviews-on-steroids/)

    2. The impulse buy: The next generation.

    This is certainly a whole new (more impulsive) impulse buy. The genius of it is basically this: Remember why that bagel cart concept works? Similarly, imagine a group of yourself and your closest colleagues and friends chatting around the water cooler about the things you collectively are interested in. Coffee, technology, low calorie drinks, impressively sharp knives, a new hybrid car. Now imagine while casually talking with your friends about these subjects, one of them said something like, “Well, if you’re interested I can get you a box of those knives for $20 less than the store.” They don’t have to earn your trust. They already have it. You don’t have to drive out to the store, or search prices online. You don’t have to do anything really. It’s organic digital content for sale. You’re seeing it in your news feed because you’ve already established, digitally, that it’s something of interest to you. This is the benefit of the Facebook Buy Button concept. And this will be the primary reason why it will work.

    Don’t forget to consider when you post also. Since these aren’t traditional social media ads running automatically, you must be conscious of when you post content with the ability to buy. Read our recent blog post on The Perfect Time to Post on Social Media.

    3. The power of viral reviews

    According to Convert With Content 87% of consumers are influenced by positive reviews, and trust customer reviews 12x more than manufacturers’ descriptions. With the new Facebook Buy Button capability, customer reviews will come first and the product second. In a way, customers have already been trained to reverse engineer their purchases online. It’s been going on for years and the new Facebook Buy Button will only sharpen this modern consumer skill.

    You need to understand how this will bring on competition for your sales. Facebook won’t be alone. Already, Twitter has announced it purchased a payments start up for integration in it’s ever-growing platform. Don’t be surprised if more join soon. The time to plan accordingly and add some grey area to your direct and indirect competition matrices is now. Wondering why your customers stopped buying sunglasses from you? Have they evolved where you haven’t?

    The future of online retail may be upon us. LIKE it? Don’t buy it? Tell us what you think with your comments below or let us know on Facebook!

  2. A Practical Content Marketing Example

    Many marketers are still coming around to the idea of content marketing and how it positively impacts both consumer preference, conversion and search engine optimization. To provide some illumination on the concept of content marketing as well as some simple context, let’s look at a practical example of how content marketing works.

    I was recently asked by the University of Central Florida (Orlando, FL) to deliver a webinar to some start-up ventures associated with its incubator.  The subject matter of the webinar includes marketing, web design, and Internet strategy.  The audience of the webinar is to be comprised of small business owners, marketers and technology executives.

    I don’t conduct webinars very frequently, so I had a couple of questions about the best practices of duration, platform, and otherwise.  But one of the most pressing questions on my mind was *when* to conduct the webinar.  I was curious about the best days of the week and time of day to conduct a webinar to maximize attendance.  Like most people, I went to Google for an answer.

    I typed  ‘what is the best time to schedule a webinar?’ into Google.  There, on the first page of search results, was a blog post from AccuConference, a company that helps people like me conduct Webinars:

    The first page of results for the query ‘ what is the best time to schedule a webinar?’

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    When I clicked on the link, I was taken to a well-constructed page (see below) from the company which contained its expert opinion on what days and times tend to work best for business people to attend webinars.  The page is clean, simple, and contains the right keywords in some of the right places.  And, most importantly to the company, I was introduced to the company’s products–software and services to help people conduct online meetings and webinars.

    A well-constructed blog post that ranks on the first page of Google search results for a highly relevant search query.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    We can learn a great deal from this example, but here are a few of the more important take-aways about content marketing:

    • Blogging is not a waste of time!  This company has likely invested a great deal of time in creating relevant content to reach their customers.
    • Content marketing meets people where they’re at and when they’re there.  If this company would have sent me a spam e-mail message months ago (when I wasn’t particularly interested in webinars), the marketing message would have never reached me.  Instead, this approach caters to a captive audience.  People who look for things on Google want them now, not later.
    • A great place to start with content marketing is anticipating the questions your audience might be asking when they need your product.  This is not an exact science, but you can certainly brainstorm, talk to customers, and look to your analytics results for clarity.

    In a world where we’re increasingly bombarded by more marketing messages than we can handle, seek not to become a part of that fray but to use content marketing to reach your customers at the exact moment they need you.

  3. What is Content Marketing?

    Content marketing is a quickly-emerging area of practice for marketers.  It is emerging rapidly and will continue to be more and more important as time goes on.  But before defining exactly what content marketing is, it is important to acknowledge the shifts in the landscape of consumer behavior:

    • Consumers are no longer using the Yellow Pages to shop for things
    • People are turning to Google, Bing and other search engines to shop for products and services
    • Buyers are reaching out to friends and acquaintances on social networks to look for recommendations and reviews

    If you ponder this shift in consumer behavior–especially the search for products on Google–the challenge of marketing becomes much different the old days of designing a yellow pages ad.

    Content marketing is a term which refers to the development, production and sharing of content in order to attract and engage a specific audience in profitable activity.  In short, content marketing is the practice of using information to gain customers.

    Consider the first time homeowner who has a small hole in her drywall.  Puzzled by how to fix it, she doesn’t even think of looking for a solution in the phone book.  Instead she reflexively enters ‘fix a hole in my drywall’ in Google.  If you are a marketer selling spackling paste, drywall saws, or home repair services, this represents a critical moment–an inflection point.  The goal of your content marketing strategy should be to gain exposure to this consumer at this moment.

    Content can take many forms.  It can be anything from an article or blog post to a podcast or e-book.  Content marketing can be facilitated on company websites, blogs, social networks, and user-generated sites like YouTube.  Naturally, the specific vehicles chosen for a content strategy should be selected according to the audience itself.  And similar to the tenets of search engine marketing, solid keyword research should drive the strategy.

    Getting back to our example about the role of a hole in the drywall, marketers have many many ways in which to capitalize on content marketing opportunities.  Brands like Home Depot or Lowe’s might create home improvement videos containing these search terms.  Makers of spackling paste like DAP might create instructional guides or blog posts about how to fix these holes.  Sears/Craftsman tools might create a home improvement podcast and feature this as a topic.  And all of this content can be shared and referred by customers on social networks like Facebook and Twitter.

    Scenarios like these are real examples of actual opportunities that marketers have to use content to sell products.  If marketers take a concerted approach to content marketing, they have the potential to not only acknowledge the big shifts in consumer behavior, but be well-positioned in the eyes of the consumer at the exact moment when they are needed.

  4. Google: Getting to the Top

    Almost every day I entertain the question of how one can snatch a number one listing on Google for a particular keyword or keyphrase. As anyone who has worked with search engines know, this is not at all a simple answer. There are too many variables to consider in terms of industry, stature in the marketplace, target market, and longevity. My typical tact is to try not to give a definitive answer (because, often, one does not exist) but to help clients think about how Google functions and how it might work for them. Similar to the ‘training versus educating’ line of demarcation, the first step toward Google success is learning how to think about it.
    In my conversations with clients, I try and help them think through several concepts related to how Google functions with a Web site and how it assigns rankings. Many of the mechanics of Google are trade secrets (think the Coca-Cola recipe) and unknown by anyone outside of a select few employees. There are several widely accepted principles, though, that guide search engine marketers in how to cozy up to high Google rankings.
    For the sake of simplicity, let’s think of these accepted principles in two categories:
    1. On-site factors: Google takes a look at the content and structure of your Web site to determine how relevant it is to a particular keyword or keyphrase
    2. Off-site factors: Google looks at the greater Internet (factors external to your Web site) and how it relates to your site
    Once you understand this delineation, you’re on the way to understanding higher rankings. Let’s take a look at some of the invididual principles within each of these categories.
    On-site factors
    1. Google cares about your content, how original and genuine it is, how often it is updated, and how many times a particular keyword/keyphrase is used.
    2. Google looks for specific, descriptive tags (called META tags and TITLE tags) and the keywords therein.
    3. The presence of a site map (similar to an outline) within your Web site denotes structure, organization, and a specific hierarchy to Google.
    4. Google evaluates your site to determine how structurally sound (i.e. strong coding) your site is as a measure of its relevance.
    5. Google can’t often interpret images and FLASH content, so the site must contain a balance between readable text and graphics.
    Off-site factors
    1. Google counts the number of sites that link to yours.
    2. Google determines how relevant/important those linking sites are; a link from a heavily-visited site is more valuable than a link from a site with little traffic.
    3. Google looks to see how long your domain has been existence and in its database; as a rule of thumb, domains with longer lives are seen as more legitimate.
    4. Google evaluates the text within incoming links as a way to characterize what words are associated with your site.
    5. Google looks to other closely-related sites like a corporate blog or other affiliated site as a way to determine how relevant your site is.
    This list isn’t meant to represent a be-all / end-all. Anyone who tells you that they have such a list is likely exaggerating (or violating a Google patent protection). It hopefully is, though, a start toward helping you to strategically think about Google and how to find your way to the top!