Tag Archive: Internet Marketing

  1. Findsome & Winmore Continues Momentum In Third Quarter of 2017

    Findsome & Winmore, the classic digital marketing agency that helps clients “find and win” new customers, completed a successful third quarter with the addition of new employees and new projects for clients. The company, which is currently in its fourth quarter, announced today the addition of a new client within the real estate industry and the completion of two client rebrands.

    Park Square Homes, a residential real estate company, enlisted Findsome & Winmore for various services including public relations, website maintenance, and digital marketing. Additionally, the agency completed rebrands for Bourne Financial Group, a real estate private equity company, Spectrum Global, a telecommunications firm, and Tews, an employment agency. Both Tews and Bourne Financial Group also hired Findsome & Winmore to create their respective company websites.

    “We are pleased to know that our clients continue to put their trust in Findsome & Winmore in their digital marketing endeavors,” said Matt Certo, chief executive officer of Findsome & Winmore. “We had a very solid third quarter and are looking forward to ending 2017 on a high note, with additional clients and new projects. As we move through our fourth quarter, we anticipate helping even more clients find and win new customers.”

    Findsome & Winmore also added three new employees to its growing team with backgrounds in creativity, marketing and public relations. Moreover, the company continued to expand its content presence through its email marketing series, entitled “Marketing Tip Monday,” providing subscribers with tips on an array of business growth topics, http://www.marketingtipmonday.com

  2. 2015 Marketing Campaigns We Loved

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    Did you know that every time a bell rings a marketing campaign gets its wings? Well, maybe the wings part is fiction, but they sure do sprout into this world at a rapid pace. With 365 days for different marketing initiatives across a variety of mediums (think email, web, social, native, etc.), there are plenty. Here’s a little breakdown on digital campaigns we FOUND and think WON this year.

    Geico’s Unskippable YouTube Ads

    If you’re like me and every other person I know, you typically tune out the preroll ads on YouTube right when you click play. You know they’re coming up, so you check out for a couple of seconds until you’re ready to watch your intended video. Knowing this, Geico’s marketing team opted to strategically alter their content to combat this issue.

    What Geico did was hook the viewer during the first five seconds, knowing that if they couldn’t get them then, they’ve lost them forever (or until the desired and intended video starts). They did this by creating digital ads that concentrated all messaging efforts on the first five seconds of the video while rolling funny, albeit ridiculous, footage afterwards for pure entertainment purposes. The real pull was that these ads put a new spin on preroll video and grabbed the attention of Geico’s peers, other digital marketing strategy agencies and yours truly. Check out one of the videos below for yourself.

    Domino’s Tweet-to-Order

    Pizza. Check. Twitter. Check. Emojis. Huh?

    pizza emoji

     

    You would think I was checking off a weird lunch/work list, but no, it’s just me talking about the Domino’s 2015 campaign and long-term strategy that struck a chord with millennials and more. Speaking to the five seconds that resonated with Geico, Domino’s understands that getting your message across in a clear, concise and clever way matters more now than ever. They also understand that ease and speed is more important to customers than ever too. Understanding that, they’ve given the ability to TWEET AN ORDER FOR PIZZA IN JUST ONE EMOJI. Right? It amazes me too. We might not be living the Jetson’s lifestyle I thought we would be by now, but we can tweet for pizza! That’s a win in my book, as it’s way more efficient than signing in online or calling in an order.

    All you need to do is register your Twitter handle on your Domino’s Pizza Profile. You can then tweet the pizza emoji or #EasyOrder to the Domino’s Twitter handle and, BOOM, you get a direct message confirming your order. Then pizza will be on its way to your home, office, bodega, wherever. Joy!

    This newfound system is a part of Domino’s AnyWare ordering technology. Not only can you order food from your computer and phone, but your smartwatch and smart TV as well. The digital options are nearly endless.

    The future is here my friends.

    Always “Like a Girl”

    A smart and heart-tugging campaign will, of course, be in the mix. You’ve got funny (the Geico campaign), the genius tech-centric (the Domino’s one) and now you have the smart, empowering and beautiful one.

    The Always “Like a Girl” campaign did exactly what it intended to:

    • Brought attention to the limitations put on girls by social norms
    • Established Always as an ambassador for equality

    The campaign first drew attention on SuperBowl weekend, with the Always 60-second spot airing during the big game. The reason this commercial stood out in its time slot was that it was so different from any of the previously played commercials. The spot challenged the idea that doing something “like a girl” is an insult, which is what it’s commonly thought of. Instead, it promoted the idea that anything performed “like a girl” could and should be associated with strength.

    The video was inspired by a study sponsored by Always. The results found that more than half of the respondents experienced reduced confidence during puberty, which occurs between the ages of 10-14 in girls. At the start of the video, it shows a group of kids, ages 10-14, acting out what “like a girl” means when speaking about certain activities. Those in this group presented themselves as weaker when acting out what “like a girl” means. When asking a younger group, the individual kids responded with assertiveness and power, showing the strength in what being a girl means and is.

    Social experiment campaigns (remember Dove’s Real Beauty?) that help shift social norms to a positive are always something that we can back…like a girl. 😉 WINNING!

    The above are just some of the many smart and creative campaigns that have grabbed our attention this year as the time ticks towards 2016. We hope the campaigns of the future present us with many more thoughtful, smart, creative and engaging campaigns to look forward to. Remember, the foundation of these campaigns is always a strong marketing strategy.

  3. What Facebook’s New “Buy Button” Means for Your Business

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    You know that guy with the bagel cart rolling by your office in the morning? You were busy getting started on your business of the day, then this guy rolls up and well, now you’re hungry. “Ok,” you think to yourself. “I’ll grab a bagel.”

    The convenience of the impulse buy is hard to ignore. And more often than not, it doesn’t feel like we’re being sold or marketed to. We usually feel pretty confident that this is our decision. Yes, we didn’t know we were about to make this purchase, but we are totally in control and definitely want it. Right?

    Recently Facebook announced their new Buy Button which will allow your customers to purchase products from businesses without ever having to leave Facebook, mobile included. Your customers will be able to complete their entire order process (even shipping settings and payment) all in one cozy nook of the world’s favorite social media home away from home. Whether this sounds scary or convenient, it’s time to start planning how your business will adapt. Here are 3 things to consider when examining the new Facebook Buy Button, and what it means to you and your business.

    1. Say Goodbye to distracting ads and hello to engaging content.

    If you’ve ever tried Facebook ads to promote your company or goods and services, the buy button is a good thing. Buying online ads are hard to quantify from a success point of view. Sure you can track clicks and click throughs, even track where purchases came from. But these efforts typically work better in concept than application. Here’s the next step. Stop buying traditional Facebook Ads. With the buy button you no longer have to throw money at distracting your customers. You can, instead, connect with them via your content. Content that they’d be choosing to engage with anyway. Have a cool new product you want to get out to market, or even test? This could be where you do that.

    It’s a fact of life that many content owners are now looking to their “readers’ offers” initiatives to build e-commerce into their content sites. – Forbes (http://www.forbes.com/sites/haydnshaughnessy/2014/07/18/facebook-shopping-button-could-be-amazon-reviews-on-steroids/)

    2. The impulse buy: The next generation.

    This is certainly a whole new (more impulsive) impulse buy. The genius of it is basically this: Remember why that bagel cart concept works? Similarly, imagine a group of yourself and your closest colleagues and friends chatting around the water cooler about the things you collectively are interested in. Coffee, technology, low calorie drinks, impressively sharp knives, a new hybrid car. Now imagine while casually talking with your friends about these subjects, one of them said something like, “Well, if you’re interested I can get you a box of those knives for $20 less than the store.” They don’t have to earn your trust. They already have it. You don’t have to drive out to the store, or search prices online. You don’t have to do anything really. It’s organic digital content for sale. You’re seeing it in your news feed because you’ve already established, digitally, that it’s something of interest to you. This is the benefit of the Facebook Buy Button concept. And this will be the primary reason why it will work.

    Don’t forget to consider when you post also. Since these aren’t traditional social media ads running automatically, you must be conscious of when you post content with the ability to buy. Read our recent blog post on The Perfect Time to Post on Social Media.

    3. The power of viral reviews

    According to Convert With Content 87% of consumers are influenced by positive reviews, and trust customer reviews 12x more than manufacturers’ descriptions. With the new Facebook Buy Button capability, customer reviews will come first and the product second. In a way, customers have already been trained to reverse engineer their purchases online. It’s been going on for years and the new Facebook Buy Button will only sharpen this modern consumer skill.

    You need to understand how this will bring on competition for your sales. Facebook won’t be alone. Already, Twitter has announced it purchased a payments start up for integration in it’s ever-growing platform. Don’t be surprised if more join soon. The time to plan accordingly and add some grey area to your direct and indirect competition matrices is now. Wondering why your customers stopped buying sunglasses from you? Have they evolved where you haven’t?

    The future of online retail may be upon us. LIKE it? Don’t buy it? Tell us what you think with your comments below or let us know on Facebook!

  4. Outback Steakhouse Does Online Ordering Right

    We recently tried the online ordering system at Outback Steakhouse. I went to the Web site to simply download the menu for phone-in service, but decided to try the online ordering system as they seemed to be promoting it.
    I was very impressed by the ability of the online system. You could really tell that the logistics had really been pondered. I think the user interface could use a bit of work in an effort to make things more intuitive, but it was certainly adequate.
    The system allowed me to select various menu items, add special instructions to certain items (hold the onions, please), and used dynamic menus to present me with salad/site item choices. It also asked me what Make and Model of car I would be picking the order up in. What impressed me most was the ability to set my own pick-up time. Since I wanted to see the last 15 minutes of SportsCenter, I gave myself an extra 20 minutes by selecting my desired time from a drop-down selection.
    I arrived a few minutes before the designated time. The attendant came out curb-side and, recognizing my car, asked if I was Matt! Pretty impressive. She took my card, came back with my receipt and order 1 minute prior to my requested pick-up time. Needless to say, I was very impressed.
    My only complaint was that the “medium” steak I ordered was a bit on the rare side. I have to say that the convenience and ease of the online ordering system made up for any shortcomings in the order. I would definitely recommend it!

  5. Orlando PRSA Links

    I had the chance today to address a large group of public relations professionals at the Orlando chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (www.prsaorlando.org). As part of my talk, I promised to post some links of some of the sites we discussed. Here is a brief run-down:

  6. WordTracker
  7. – a great resource for keyword research

  8. Seth Godin’s Four Things Worth Doing
  9. – Core Web principles to keep in mind

  10. Google Analytics
  11. – powerful analytical tool for marketers

  12. Web 2.0 Wikipedia Entry
  13. – a general description of the concept

  14. Threadless
  15. – an oft-touted Web 2.0 concept in action

  16. Apple iPhone
  17. – likely game-changer in Web mobility

    Thanks again to the group for having me…I genuinely enjoyed the exchange!

  18. Yahoo’s Recent Re-design

    BusinessWeek had a great article last week about the process Yahoo recently used to re-design its Web site. In my years consulting with corporations about re-design efforts, it is interesting to see the dynamics involved with design choices. Unfortunately, many of these efforts are about gut feelings, ego, or turf battles; every department or branch seems to want a link/icon/banner/button on the home page to gain exposure or generate traffic. Re-design efforts can often result in poor visual output and even poorer results.
    The article chronicles Yahoo’s pragmatic, customer-centric process in which ego was checked at the door and actual cutomer data drove the endeavor.