Tag Archive: content

  1. “Medium” is Large On Content

    "Medium" is Large On Content

    Two of the internet’s top ten websites have been created by American serial entrepreneur, Evan Williams: Blogger and Twitter. In 2012, he and Twitter co-founder Biz Stone unveiled medium.com, the word-centric website for clever content over 140 characters.

    Medium’s goal is to provide a platform for writers, meaningful content to “readers” and the ability to source more meaningful metrics behind content engagement. The site is used by a wide audience, from professional journalists to amateur cooks.

    The Difference:
    Traditional news editors have always relied on intuition for what drives readership, while Medium relies on reader insights.

    Medium is essentially the Pandora of the written word. Utilizing an intelligent algorithm, Medium suggests stories based on interest, engagement and time spent reading, rather than focusing merely on page views. To further the reader’s relationship with Medium “stories”, the site provides a “Reading List”, a “Top 100” and allows users to bookmark content.

    “Time spent is not actually a value in itself, but in a world where people have infinite choices, it’s a pretty good measure if people are getting value,” explains founder Evan Williams.

    Medium: 
    1) Lets you focus on your words:
    The space is dedicated to reading and writing.

    2) Is collaborative:
    People create better things together than on their own. Medium allows you to write with other people.  There is even a get help before you hit the “Publish” button.

    3) Helps you find your audience:
    You can contribute once or often without making the commitment of a blog.

    After two years, Medium is still trying to find its way and gain a larger audience. Will bloggers abandon their blogs in favor of Medium? Will Twitter users opt for longer content and abandon the “Follower mentality”? Will Medium become a dominant force in news content? Only time will tell.

    In the end, Medium is a fantastic experience for the both the reader and writer. Give it a try and let us know what you think.

  2. Social Media Marketing Drives Search Engine Marketing

    Every two years, Moz (formerly SEOMoz.org) surveys a group of SEO experts and asks them to give their opinions on what factors they believe will be most important in driving search engine rankings.  Since Google and other search engines do not make the mechanics of their algorithms publicly available, surveys like this are important to try and identify patterns and trends.  The results of the 2013 survey are now available online and there are some interesting conclusions to be drawn.

    In the world of SEO, things change quickly and dramatically.  In order to gain a little context, it may be helpful to review the results of an older survey (i.e. the 2009 survey) to see how the times have changed.  Just four short years ago, having the proper text inside a link was crucial; now, that practice is almost frowned upon.  As such, keeping tabs on these factors is important to any marketer who wants to rank well in keyword searches.

    While some of the survey results are pretty technical in nature, there are some really important generalizations that can be made.  Most notably, social media marketing continues to increase in importance with regard to how search engines rank a particular page or site.  From the survey results, here are some key take-aways on this point:

    • Google+ – How many +1’s (the equivalent of a Like on Facebook) that your page/site has is very high on the chart.  If a company has no Google+ presence, the time has come to move forward in creating and developing one.  Better late than never!
    • Facebook Likes, Shares, and Comments – Your pages must be tied to Facebook and boldly solicit Likes and Shares.  Google looks at the number of times your pages are liked and shared and considers these as votes for your content.
    • Twitter Influence – Your site and content will be measured for its appeal on Twitter.  The more tweets and influence on Twitter, the more favorably characterized your page will be.
    • Content, Content, Content  – This is not a new revelation by any means, but it is a known quantity that high quality content drives search engine visibility AND the three categories mentioned above.  Sites without fresh, interesting, and engaging content don’t receive social media attention from Google+, Facebook, or Twitter.

    There are many other conclusions to be drawn from this important survey, but it’s abundantly clear that truly working on your social media strategy will go a long way toward increasing your site’s search engine visibility.  A brief snippet of some of the results are below, but you might consider reviewing the full survey results for yourself.

    A glimpse of the 2013 Search Engine Ranking Factors survey results.

    A glimpse of the 2013 Search Engine Ranking Factors survey results courtesy of moz.com.