Tag Archive: Business Blogging

  1. “Medium” is Large On Content

    "Medium" is Large On Content

    Two of the internet’s top ten websites have been created by American serial entrepreneur, Evan Williams: Blogger and Twitter. In 2012, he and Twitter co-founder Biz Stone unveiled medium.com, the word-centric website for clever content over 140 characters.

    Medium’s goal is to provide a platform for writers, meaningful content to “readers” and the ability to source more meaningful metrics behind content engagement. The site is used by a wide audience, from professional journalists to amateur cooks.

    The Difference:
    Traditional news editors have always relied on intuition for what drives readership, while Medium relies on reader insights.

    Medium is essentially the Pandora of the written word. Utilizing an intelligent algorithm, Medium suggests stories based on interest, engagement and time spent reading, rather than focusing merely on page views. To further the reader’s relationship with Medium “stories”, the site provides a “Reading List”, a “Top 100” and allows users to bookmark content.

    “Time spent is not actually a value in itself, but in a world where people have infinite choices, it’s a pretty good measure if people are getting value,” explains founder Evan Williams.

    Medium: 
    1) Lets you focus on your words:
    The space is dedicated to reading and writing.

    2) Is collaborative:
    People create better things together than on their own. Medium allows you to write with other people.  There is even a get help before you hit the “Publish” button.

    3) Helps you find your audience:
    You can contribute once or often without making the commitment of a blog.

    After two years, Medium is still trying to find its way and gain a larger audience. Will bloggers abandon their blogs in favor of Medium? Will Twitter users opt for longer content and abandon the “Follower mentality”? Will Medium become a dominant force in news content? Only time will tell.

    In the end, Medium is a fantastic experience for the both the reader and writer. Give it a try and let us know what you think.

  2. Ford Motor Bares its Soul

    I was told today about a new blog/community site launched by Ford Motor Company. The site is called Bold Moves. As many know, Ford has been struggling uphill in terms of sales, profitability (or lack thereof), and stock price. This kind of circumstance is very tough on an organization of this size and scale; trying to turn around a company this big is a monumental challenge.
    This new site appears to be a site for employees, customers, analysts, and otherwise to truly communicate the good, the bad, and the ugly. It is compiling news feeds from different sites that are both positive and negative toward Ford. Most noteworthy, though, is the series of video documentaries which literally take you into company meetings, conference calls, and insider conversations.
    What’s so intriguing about this whole concept, as you’ll notice, is that Ford is letting it all hang out. It’s putting out very negative information about itself…negative analyst comments, negative press, and negative customer feedback. They’re attempting to be very transparent–acknowledging the difficulties they face in an effort to truly turn around the company. You see small companies taking this path fairly often, but not so many in the corporate/publicly traded setting.
    It should be interesting to see what kind of impact it has. If nothing else, I think it is a great device for the Ford employees to stay abreast of the changes/tactics so each one has an understanding of how that should apply to them as individuals.

  3. Big/Small Company Blogging

    The St. Pete Times has a pretty interesting (and accurate) article about the different ways that small and large companies are approaching corporate blogging. Small companies seem to be embracing the medium faster than larger companies who seem to be taking more of a wait-and-see approach. It seems natural, though, in that larger companies have Sarbanes-Oxley issues, more bureaucracy to contend with, and–frankly–more to lose. The article describes attitudes in the business community which are consistent with what I see lately within small (more aggressive) and large (more hesitant) companies. Thanks to Josh, who is quoted in the article, for the tip.